Editorial

End mass incarceration

|
()

EDITORIAL We at the Bay Guardian wholeheartedly support the Stop Mass Incarceration Network and its call for the month of October to be "a month of resistance to mass incarceration, police terror, repression, and the criminalization of a generation." It's time to rediscover our humanity, redirect our resources, and invest in this country's underclass instead of attacking it.Read more »

Changing the climate in SF

|
()

EDITORIAL As hundreds of thousands of people filled the streets of New York City and other cities around the world for a Global Climate Convergence on Sept. 21, demanding that our political and business leaders finally get serious about global warming (see "Flooding the streets"), there was no such gathering in San Francisco.Read more »

Bridge the housing-Muni divide

|
()

EDITORIAL One the most frustrating political conflicts in San Francisco this election season is the schism between sustainable transportation activists and affordable housing advocates, a split that unnecessarily divides the progressive movement and one that has been cynically manipulated by the Mayor's Office and its political allies.Read more »

Defend the deal

|
()

EDITORIAL Creating a functional and equitable San Francisco for tomorrow requires political will and foresight today. Do our current political leaders have the requisite courage and commitment to the broad public interest, or are they too willing to give away the farm to powerful private interests wielding promises or threats?Read more »

Get to work

|
()

EDITORIAL The San Francisco Board of Supervisors returned to work this week after a month-long summer recess. While it may be too much to expect the supervisors to seriously tackle the many pressing issues facing this city during the fall election season, that's exactly what needs to happen.

The city has been cruising along on auto-pilot, propelled by inertia more than any coherent political leadership, its elected leaders content to throw political platitudes and miniscule policy remedies at huge problems that are fundamentally changing the city.Read more »

No comment

|
()

EDITORIAL We've heard quite a bit of reader feedback to our decision last week to indefinitely suspend comments on our SFBG.com website (see "Troll no more," page 14), most of it positive. While the Internet's potential to democratize communications has long been one of its greatest assets, the incivility and bullying fed by the anonymity of online comments have undermined that potential, and a growing number of people think the tradeoff is no longer worth it.Read more »

Burners and residents matter

|
()

EDITORIAL Burning Man and San Francisco have developed a close and symbiotic relationship in recent years, with members of the Board of Supervisors doing whirlwind VIP tours of the playa, burner artworks temporarily placed on city land, and event-sponsoring Black Rock City LLC supporting the Mayor's Office campaign to transform the Tenderloin into a nascent arts and technology district.Read more »

Airbnb must work with SF

|
()

EDITORIAL

Airbnb and other companies that facilitate illegal short-term apartment rentals to tourists visiting San Francisco need to engage in a more honest and direct dialogue with this city's political leaders and stakeholders, something that became clear during last week's Planning Commission hearing on legislation that would legalize and regulate short-term sublets.Read more »

Arguments against minimum wage increase are out of touch

|
()

EDITORIAL

"Will the SF minimum wage hike kill our restaurants?" Zagat SF tweeted last week.

No, Chicken Little, it won't. Not even if you tweet it.

Two days earlier, the Board of Supervisors had unanimously approved a measure for the November ballot to raise the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2018, up from where it stands at $10.74.Read more »

Reducing phone charges helps inmates connect with families

|
()

OPINION

It's expensive being poor. Families of inmates often live on the edge of insolvency.

I know a mother of two, married to a man doing time in the San Francisco jail, who is trapped between the domino effect of poverty and the desire to maintain her children's relationship with their father. The trouble began when her credit rating dropped due to late bill payments, which triggered the repossession of her car, which put her job at risk because public transit couldn't get her to work on-time.Read more »