Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez

Politics over policy

Paid Sunday parking meters benefit drivers, businesses, and Muni riders. So why did the plan get killed?

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Joe@sfbg.com

Paid Sunday parking meters were unanimously repealed by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency Board of Directors on April 15.

Sunday meters will be free starting July 1, a losing proposition for many, including seniors and people with disabilities who advocated for free Muni passes at the same SFMTA meeting.

There's a dire need. Betty Trainer, board president of Seniors & Disability Action, relayed a senior's story printed on one of 500 cards collected by her advocacy group.Read more »

Waterfront height-limit proponents praise Warriors arena move

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In another waterfront win, the Golden State Warriors have backed off their original arena site to another spot by the bay. 

Multiple news outlets are reporting the proposed Warriors arena is moving from its contentious and hotly debated waterfront location at Piers 30-32 to what is now the home of Salesforce, in Mission Bay, a move praised by opponents of height-exceeding waterfront devleopment.Read more »

City College special trustee restores public comments, meetings

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Protests against City College of San Francisco's leadership trumpeted grave concerns in the college community over the lack of public voice at the school. Now, some of those concerns have been resolved, and the beleagured CCSF is taking baby steps towards restoring democracy.Read more »

BART fined $210,000 for accident killing two workers

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The California Occupational Safety and Health Administration is fining Bay Area Rapid Transit $210,000 for three "willful/serious" safety violations connected to the death of two transit workers, citing a lack of safety measures at BART as the fault of their deaths. BART was fined maximum amounts allowed for the offenses, officials said. Read more »

SFMTA repeals paid Sunday parking meters, loses $9.8 million

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San Francisco transit riders won some and lost some today [Tue/15] at the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency's Board of Directors meeting. The board voted to repeal Sunday parking meters, effective July 1. It also asked SFMTA Director Ed Reiskin to add 18-year-olds into the Free Muni for Youth program, which will take effect Nov. 1. Read more »

Accreditors ask City College to voluntarily terminate its own accreditation

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Should City College commit educational seppuku?

That seems to be the idea the accrediting commission vying to close City College of San Francisco floated in a San Francisco Chronicle editorial Sunday, outlining a "new way out."

To save itself, they wrote, the college must terminate its own accreditation and apply for "candidacy" status, essentially applying to be accredited as if it were a brand-new school.Read more »

Proposed food voucher pilot program could feed thousands of hungry San Franciscans

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A pilot project to fund healthy fruit and vegetable vouchers for food insecure San Franciscans was proposed at the Board of Supervisors Neighborhood Services and Safety Committee hearing last Thursday. The innovative solution would bridge a startling hunger gap affecting thousands of Social Security beneficiaries, often seniors and families, who have little to no access to healthy food. 

Sup. Eric Mar called for the hearing on food insecurity, and afterward promised a bevy of solutions to address hunger. Read more »

Super Smash Bros. on the big screen, Sunday 4/13!

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The Nintendo game Super Smash Bros. Melee was supposed to be a party game, “fun for the whole family,” as the kids say. 

Mario sets Princess Zelda on fire. Donkey Kong smacks Pikachu so hard the little yellow rodent flies across the screen. Commercials for one version of the game feature Bugs Bunny-esque cartoon smackings, as costumed actors roll down a grassy knoll. The adorableness of Melee belies a mystery: How did a Nintendo game from 2001 become the focus of cutthroat national video game competitions?Read more »

Taxi drivers protest rideshares as government mulls new regulations

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Car horns honked and tempers flared as around 30 taxi cabs circled around the California Public Utilities Commission yesterday [Wed/9], protesting what the cabbies call lax regulations of rideshare companies such as Uber, Lyft, and Sidecar.

"They're totally unfair competition," said cab driver Jonathan Khin, a 20-year cabbie who came to San Francisco decades ago from Burma. "They don't have to pay regulations and fees that we do."

The drivers complaints over the rideshares, known legally as Transportation Network Companies, were many: the TNCs don't provide adequate insurance for drivers, don't have the number of cars regulated (like cabs are), and don't have to pay regulatory fees that cabs currently pay. This all leads to an uneven playing field, and the taxi cab industry is getting creamed.

Read more »

Kaepernick incident report details bong hits, blackout, and alleged assault

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San Francisco 49ers star quarterback Colin Kaepernick, player Quinton Patton and Seahawks receiver Ricardo Lockette are being investigated for sexual assault by Miami police, according to reports earlier today by TMZ sports (and other media outlets). 

The name of the woman at the center of the allegations was redacted from the report, which was obtained by sports site Deadspin. The only descriptor available is that she is African American. Read more »